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SiliconValley.com:Ah, Fridays: the day the

SiliconValley.com:Ah, Fridays: the day the workplace goes home Employees fortunate enough to work say business all but grinds to a halt on Friday. To get through these ``lean'' times, several computer company employees catch up on paperwork, review e-mails and even visit their gyms several times a day on Friday just to fill up their days.

E-learning Magazine: Courses for Profit

E-learning Magazine: Courses for Profit
Just about everyone agrees that e-learning is good for students. What has not been thoroughly addressed, however, is the effect of distance education on teachers, particularly in higher education. I contend that teachers often get the short end of the e-learning stick. We can fix this, but we need to define the problem better and then agree on some solutions.

E-learning Magazine: How to Teach

E-learning Magazine: How to Teach Online While many characteristics and issues of the traditional classroom are similar to the online classroom, there are major differences in how these courses are managed. (This is an important issue to note because instruction via technology is still considered optional in teacher training curricula at most colleges and universities.) For example, online communication, classroom activities, and technology issues are quite different...

E-learning Advisor: Where Is E-Learning

E-learning Advisor: Where Is E-Learning Headed?
As e-learning technology and practices mature, expect more interactivity, greater topic coverage, and a wider range of uses. Gartner reports on some of the dominant trends in e-learning -- driving forces that will influence users, vendors, and service providers. Here are the top 10...

CIO: Easy Writer Digital paper

CIO: Easy Writer
Digital paper technology also has the potential to make reading a more interesting and interactive experience -- "Pages will be able to display more than just static text and pictures. Articles, books, instruction manuals and other documents could include animated text, animation and even video images."

IT Training: E-learning

IT Training: E-learning

Training Magazine: Not Just Playing

Training Magazine: Not Just Playing
"Five years ago, I was blowing things up on online video games

KM Magazine: Personal Chemistry Dow

KM Magazine: Personal Chemistry Dow made a conscious decision to use information stewards rather than hope that KM values would grow throughout the company by themselves. "You can hope that things organically emerge in the right direction, or you can say nothing will happen unless you put senior people in these roles to be change agents. That's what we chose to do." -- Dow Chemical's information stewards are the catalysts for sharing across business units.

KM Magazine: Getting the Most

KM Magazine: Getting the Most Out of Getting Together
Given today's array of virtual meeting tools, the old standby of real-time, face-to-face human interaction may seem like an endangered species. Bringing people together can be expensive, in terms of both time and money. But such gatherings often pay off down the line. Sometimes there's just no substitute for the positive impact that a face-to-face meeting can have on successful knowledge sharing--and on the bottom line as well.

MIT Technology Review: Lessons e-Learned

MIT Technology Review: Lessons e-Learned
Q&A with Richard Larson: A lot of my colleagues, who are otherwise impeccable scientists, make statements like "there is no substitute for face-to-face learning." I take that as a research hypothesis. Some might say, "We all know the on-campus experience is the best in the world." It's certainly the most expensive. The blackboard is basically an adaptation of cave drawings. In thirty thousand years there has been the invention of the eraser. A lot of my colleagues say asynchronous learning is revolutionary, but cave drawings are an example of that. The artist shared what he knew about buffalo, or what-have-you, and the painting made it asynchronous. The printing press revolutionized asynchronous learning.

CIO: Quick Poll Report: CIOs

CIO: Quick Poll Report: CIOs shy away from e-learning
E-learning may be a good idea, but it is not good enough to withstand more pressing priorities for CIOs in these tight economic times. Slightly more than 83 percent of respondents to a Quick Poll on CIO.com say they do not have an e-learning initiative underway, though many still recognize its potential.

Audible.com: Who is the “on-line

Audible.com: Who is the "on-line learner"?
What type of person chooses to pursue a degree on-line rather than in a traditional classroom? And are they confident their on-line degree will be worth anything in the marketplace? Hear this MarketplaceTech report on how high tech is changing education.
[Note: Real Media/Media Player Format]

The Standard: Get With The

The Standard: Get With The Program Curl just might revolutionize the way Web sites are made. Who thinks so? Tim Berners-Lee. Curl's ubergeeks have created a programming language they claim encompasses everything HTML and Java can do, along with a browser plug-in to deliver Web content,

Fastrak-Consulting: Learning swap shop Peer-to-peer

Fastrak-Consulting: Learning swap shop
Peer-to-peer technology, in the form of systems such as Napster, created a popular revolution that just for while threatened the smug complacency of the media industry and spawned talk of the next 'Internet revolution'. With Napster on the retreat in the face of a barrage of lawsuits, the P2P bandwagon may be grinding to a halt, but the potential for positive application of the power of peer-to-peer communication over networks is still alluring, not least to the e-learning industry.

CNET: School’s out for virtual

CNET: School's out for virtual university
Harcourt Higher Education, which launched a much-ballyhooed online college in Massachusetts last year, is closing the school's virtual doors this fall without a single mortarboard tossed in the air.

HBS Working Knowledge: Why Your

HBS Working Knowledge: Why Your Organization Isn't Learning All It Should
We propose that research on problem-solving behavior can provide critical insight into mechanisms through which organizations resist learning and change. In this paper, we describe typical front-line worker response to obstacles that hinder their effectiveness and argue that this pattern of behavior creates an important and overlooked barrier to organizational change.

CNET: The art and innovation

CNET: The art and innovation behind a new IM
Long associated with casual text-based conversations among teens and singles in America Online chat rooms, IM technology is now poised not only to gain mainstream acceptance, but to establish itself as an independent platform for a variety of communications and information-gathering applications.

CNN: College courses inspired by

CNN: College courses inspired by TV shows
Obsessed with a favorite TV series? We've got a course you can't refuse, say many colleges and universities. Science students at Washington & Jefferson University in Washington, Pennsylvania, can learn some of the methods demonstrated on the CBS series, "CSI: Crime Scene Investigators...

BizJournals: Online learning has its

BizJournals: Online learning has its limits, consultant says
"I still think that instructor-led training will be around for a while, just because we're people creatures. I think it'd be a shame if we just relied on our computers for training without having personal interaction."

BizJournals: Penn State offering online

BizJournals: Penn State offering online MBA
Penn State University has joined the ranks of schools that are offering MBA courses online. The online master of business administration, dubbed the iMBA, launched this month.

Red Herring: Generation now gets

Red Herring: Generation now gets up to speed
During the first quarter of this year, while technology investors were fretting over the Nasdaq's slump, something else was happening that hadn't happened in five years: the output per hour of U.S. workers in the nonfarm business sector (the traditional measure of productivity) was lower than in the previous quarter -- 1.2 percent lower, to be exact. When word of this development got out in May, it sent economy watchers into a tizzy, reigniting long-standing arguments about whether investments in technology make companies more productive and whether these incremental improvements, in turn, produce a sustainable rate of productivity growth for the U.S. economy.

Camworld: Just-in-Time Journalism Technology conferences

Camworld: Just-in-Time Journalism
Technology conferences and events are a natural point of origin for this new kind of "just-in-time journalism". Conference planners are now making it a point to have wireless Internet access available and those reporters with laptops and a wireless card can sit in the audience and quietly tap away, recording the event in realtime and publishing it on a web site. Delivering the information people crave, when they want it: instantly. In today's "instant access" society, on-demand information services may be just the thing to revive the current slump in online journalism and news. Think of it as a service. Perhaps even a service that people would pay for.

USA Today: Anthropologists adapt technology

USA Today: Anthropologists adapt technology to world's cultures
Think anthropologists spend their days hanging out in Pago Pago studying the local culture? Think again. Like everyone else, anthropologists and ethnographers increasingly are finding jobs with high-tech companies, using their highly developed skills as observers to study how people live, work and use technology.

The Chronicle: Maryland Colleges Band

The Chronicle: Maryland Colleges Band Together to Train Professors to Teach Online
The group, called the Faculty Online Technology Training Consortium, offered its first intensive training program last summer, putting 40 professors through nine days of training in how to teach in a virtual classroom. Those faculty members were then encouraged to go back to their institutions and instruct others in how to teach online.

Washington Post: Instant Messaging Isn’t

Washington Post: Instant Messaging Isn't Everyone's Next Best Thing Instant messaging -- the ability to zap text notes back and forth to people in real time -- is supposed to be the greatest thing since Coke in a can or beer in a keg. So why do so some Internet users want nothing to do with it?

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