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BBC: Hi-tech tome takes on paperbacks

BBC: Hi-tech tome takes on paperbacks

"Researchers at Hewlett Packard have developed a prototype electronic book which can hold a whole library on a device no bigger than a paperback."

Intelligent Enterprise: Sharing Leads to Abundance

Intelligent Enterprise: Sharing Leads to Abundance

Don Tapscott: "I am struck by the excellent work in this area by Roger L. Martin, dean of the Joseph L. Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. He argues that managers should think of knowledge work as falling into three categories: procedural, heuristic, and executive. These categories are important because they help us better understand the actual content of work, and thereby the extent of transparency and knowledge the worker needs."

IBM: Gray matter matters: Preserving critical knowledge in the 21st century

IBM: Gray matter matters: Preserving critical knowledge in the 21st century

"Changes in workforce demographics, labor migration patterns and economic conditions are causing organizations to face the challenge of retaining critical knowledge that is departing the organization. This paper probes the knowledge retention crisis that faces many organizations today, providing insights into driving trends and guidance on the actions organizations can take to tackle this issue."

Darwin: Are You Looking in All the Wrong Places?

Darwin: Are You Looking in All the Wrong Places?

"It does a large corporation little good to work in different industries if it cannot move and recombine the ideas, objects and people it finds in one that might be valuable in another. Sure, top-level executives can back different divisions like so many racehorses, but the synergies available from such a diverse set of experiences are often lost in the process. By the same token, a company's employees can share everything they know with one another, but if all they know are the same customers, the same products and the same manufacturing practices, then those interactions lose much of their value. In these cases, a strong organizational memory can be a detriment because it traps firms in the past."

NY Times Interactive: A Heavy Toll

NY Times Interactive: A Heavy Toll

Another fantastic effort from NY Times. This interactive explores how overfishing has changed the world's oceans. Notice how they've used a single image to create the illusion of a movie, and how the narration holds the entire piece together.

Yuri Engelhardt: The Language of Graphics

Yuri Engelhardt: The Language of Graphics

When I try to understand the principles of the language of graphics, I ask the following questions:

  1. What kind of cognitive structures might be involved when people create and interpret graphics?
  2. What are the basic principles of the visual representation of information (universal?)
  3. How can the syntactic structure of graphics be described? (generation and parsing?)
Here are some examples of Visual Representation...

SFGate: Probing tech’s heart Social scientists seek technology’s human side

SFGate: Probing tech's heart Social scientists seek technology's human side

"Patterns of online interactivity -- from how many posts you make on a discussion group to how long you take to answer an e-mail -- say a lot about the people typing the messages, researchers are finding."

Wired: Learning to Love PowerPoint

Wired: Learning to Love PowerPoint

"Having never used the program before, I found it limiting, inflexible, and biased, like most software. On top of that, PowerPoint makes hilariously bad-looking visuals. But that's a small price to pay for ease and utility. We live in a world where convenience beats quality every time. It was, for my purposes, perfect."

KM Magazine: The ‘‘Other’’ Knowledge

KM Magazine: The ''Other'' Knowledge

"I very rarely ever think in words at all," replied Albert Einstein when asked how he comes up with his ideas. This is a universal truth. We all, at least initially, think in images and symbols contained in our unconscious. Later, we use language to approximate these perceptions, at which time they become concepts, or to put it slightly differently, interpretations of perceptions.

Harvard Working Knowledge: Project Planning: Fuzziness = Failur

Harvard Working Knowledge: Project Planning: Fuzziness = Failure

"Studies of exceptional project managers in fast time-to-market industries show that the initial phase of a complex project, often referred to as the fuzzy front end, has a disproportionately large impact on the end results. All the recommendations that follow flow from one counterintuitive insight: The traditional operational focus of project management will doom a complex project."

Intranet Journal: Gathering Requirements: The Crux of the Matter

Intranet Journal: Gathering Requirements: The Crux of the Matter

"Perhaps the most important piece of any application development project is requirements gathering. After all, if you're not clear on where you're going, how will you know when you get there? Here are critical success factors for successful requirements gathering."

Learning Circuits: MotivatingOnline Particpants

Learning Circuits: Motivating Online Participants

"In order for online learning to be successful, developers need to create environments in which people can effectively learn. Participants need to be open to learning in this new way, and confident that their time invested in professional development is well-spent. So, how do we motivate our online participants? Keep this list in mind when designing your online courses and interacting with your learners and you may be amazed at what a difference a little motivation makes... ."

UIE: Field Studies: The Best Tool to Discover User Needs

UIE: Field Studies: The Best Tool to Discover User Needs

"The most valuable asset of a successful design team is the information they have about their users. When teams have the right information, the job of designing a powerful, intuitive, easy-to-use interface becomes tremendously easier. When they don't, every little design decision becomes a struggle. While techniques, such as focus groups, usability tests, and surveys, can lead to valuable insights, the most powerful tool in the toolbox is the 'field study'. Field studies get the team immersed in the environment of their users and allow them to observe critical details for which there is no other way of discovering."

New Book: Knowledge Networks: Innovation through Communities of Practice

New Book: Knowledge Networks: Innovation through Communities of Practice

"There have been a large number of academic papers about Communities of Practice but, so far, only a few books. Most of the books have, by necessity, taken a rather theoretical approach. This book however will examine CoPs from a practical viewpoint; it is directed at the general reader rather than a specialist audience. Our aim is to draw on the experience of people who have researched and worked with CoPs in the real world and to present their views in a form that is accessible to a broad audience."

CNET: Aus study debunks e-learning myths

CNET: Aus study debunks e-learning myths

"The research, which involved 18,000 full-time students in 2002, dismisses popular beliefs that online schools are dominated by males, are only for the young and that students living in rural areas are disadvantaged."

MIT Tech Review: India Turns to Community Computing

MIT Tech Review: India Turns to Community Computing

"cheap information kiosks are helping India bring computing power to the masses, providing a model for how to bridge the digital divide."

Common Craft: How I Would Implement Weblogs in Business

Common Craft: How I Would Implement Weblogs in Business

"In retrospect- a Weblog could have been extremely valuable to me and the company. Using a Weblog, I could chronicle the daily activities, learnings, experiences and developments of the community. As the community grew and interest spread, the Weblog could have become the best single resource for understanding the internal workings of the community, why it works, what we'd learned, what the manager does, what the members think, etc. I could have reserved 30 minutes a day to post what I'm thinking, doing, learning."

Fastrak: Training the e-trainer

Fastrak: Training the e-trainer

"Before looking at the skills needed by e-trainers (those that run virtual classrooms), it makes sense to reflect on what a good virtual classroom session would look like if you were to meet it. Anyone who has attended a number of sessions is likely to have already encountered the dreaded

Workforce: The Bookstore Battle

Workforce: The Bookstore Battle

"Trying to make your company stand out from your competitor? You

Working Knowledge: Cheap, Fast, and In Control: How Tech Aids Innovation

Working Knowledge: Cheap, Fast, and In Control: How Tech Aids Innovation

"We need to appreciate that new knowledge comes as much from failure as it does from success. Innovators learn from failure: Understanding what doesn

Useit: Information Pollution

Useit: Information Pollution

"Each little piece of useless chatter is relatively innocent, and only robs us of a few seconds. The cumulative effect, however, is much worse: we assume that most communication is equally useless and tune it out, thus missing important information that's sometimes embedded in the mess."

MCLI: Syndicating Learning Objects with RSS and Trackback

MCLI: Syndicating Learning Objects with RSS and Trackback

"Learning objects repositories are growing in number with no end to arguments about definitions, meta-data, granularity, etc. The discovery process is ultimately limited to what one can search within a single collection. We propose that, with very little technical effort, the content of these repositories could be easily "syndicated" in numerous formats with existing RSS standard formats."

Gestalt & Typography

Gestalt & Typography: Principles of Proximity and Similarity

Nice Shockwave presentation showing how proximity and similarity affects readability.

BBC: The Life of Mammals

BBC: The Life of Mammals

Here's another excellent project from the BBC. I liked the way they've designed the quizzes.

Donald Norman: Emotional Design: People and Things

Donald Norman: Emotional Design: People and Things

"Our studies lead us to suspect that just as we might be able to classify products along three dimensions of attractiveness (visceral), functional and usable (behavioral) and high in prestige (reflective), we can also classify people along these dimensions. Visceral level people will be strongly biased toward appearance, behavioral people towards function, usability, and how much the feel in control during use. And Reflective level people (who would seldom admit to be one), are heavily biased by brand name, by prestige, and by the value a product brings to their self-image

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